Dawn J. Bennett’s Exclusive Interview with Niger Innis, Political Consultant & Commentator

Dawn J. Bennett, Host of Financial Myth Busting with Dawn J. Bennett, recently interviewed Niger Innis, an MSNBC commentator and political consultant. Innis is the national spokesperson for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), an organization committed to confronting and banishing apartheid in America, as well as fighting for Americans of all races. He also leads Tea Party Forward, one of the largest national Tea Party groups in the country. In his interview with Dawn J. Bennett, Innis discusses the upcoming presidential election and Black Lives Matter.

The Presidential Race

Innis says it’s a “very real possibility” that Donald Trump could be the next president. “We’re [Tea Party Forward] not quite sure just yet about Donald Trump, we’re all supporting him now, now that Ted Cruz has dropped out, and we certainly prefer Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton, but we’re certainly not sure if Donald Trump is going to be a Constitutional Conservative or could he very well be a big government Conservative.”

He continued, “So that even if he makes the choices that we would like, how he executes those choices, through executive orders or through running roughshod over Congress and not recognizing the separation of powers, is something that would concern us, that wouldn’t concern us as much with a Constitutional Conservative like Ted Cruz. On the flipside though, what thrills the Tea Party about Donald Trump is his ability to confound the media, his ability to not only circumvent the media, the establishment media, but to actually shape and confront the media and get them to talk, to say his talking points as opposed to him playing from their song sheet.”

Innis believes Trump can appeal to the black community.

“I think his talk of building a wall, the economic American nationalism that he promotes, it’s something that would appeal greatly to a number of black Americans,” he says. “Particularly, we hear in this election and we see it and we often say that it’s a reflection of angry white males—Trump’s popularity. But the little hidden story is that is not talked about as much is that there are a lot of black males and Latino males that are angry too, that are unemployed or underemployed and want an opportunity to earn a living and be breadwinners for their family.”

Black Lives Matter

On the subject of Black Lives Matter, Innis believes their protests are not helping racial minorities, primarily because they’re “hardly reflective of the black agenda”.

He notes, “There was a poll taken by Gallup during the height of the Black Lives Matter movement and spotlight on them in the August of 2015, this was post-Ferguson. And in that poll, it asked the question to all Americans, but in particular the blacks, it asked: do you think that there are too many police in the community, not enough police in the community, or just enough. When you combine those that believe that there were just enough, just the right amount of police in the community, or not enough in the community, that number was 89%.”

He continued, “Those that thought that there were too many police in the community, that you would think would be reflective of the Black Lives Matter ideology, was 10 percent. So, it was nine to one in the black community of those who felt that we want as many cops that we have in the community right now, or we want more cops in the community.”

To view Dawn J. Bennett’s complete interview with Niger Innis, click here.

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